The Doctoral Student-Advisor Relationship

Dr. Holly Schneider, a recent alumna in Higher Education, believes that doctoral student graduation rates matter.


Dr. Holly Schneider, a recent alumna in Higher Education, believes that doctoral student graduation rates matter. In her dissertation entitled, “Perceptions of mattering in the doctoral student and advisor relationship,” she examined psychosocial factors that contributed to doctoral student persistence and completion. According to Dr. Schneider, “preliminary research found that faculty-student relationships and collegial support contributed significantly to doctoral completion more so than individual factors including motivation, career goals, procrastination, financial security, and external demands such as family.” In addition she identified three components of mattering: attention, importance and dependence.

Dr. Schneider is currently the Conference Coordinator for the Association for the Study of Higher Education (ASHE). She hopes to advance in her professional career and continue to work with non-profit organizations in the future.

For additional information about ASHE, visit http://www.ashe.ws

The Changing Human Experience in a Digital World

Dr. Tettegah co-authored a book humans in an increasingly online and digital world.


Dr. Sharon Tettegah recently co-authored a textbook that is certain to increase the dialogue around how humans are evolving in an increasingly online and digital world. The text, published by Elsevier’s Academic Psychology Press, is geared towards educators, psychologists and practitioners who want to understand the role of technology in human emotions and behaviors. Specifically, the text covers topics such as the intersection between emotional contagion and emotional socialization theory in virtual interactions, cross-cultural communicative feedback, the multi-dimensions of trust in technology, and more specialized topics such as cyberbullying. This volume is one of seven in the ongoing series on Emotions and Technology: Communication of feelings for, with and through digital media.

Dr. Tettegah is a Professor in the Department of Teaching and Learning. Prior to joining UNLV she was the Program Chair of Digital Environments for Learning, Teaching and Agency in the College of Education, at the University of Illinois, at Urbana Champaign. She maintains her appointment in the Cognitive Neuroscience in Bio-Intelligence at the Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology. In addition, she is a Research Scientist and affiliate at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA). Tettegah’s research centers on the intersection of STEM learning, Emotions, Equity and Social justice. She was also a Program Director in 2010-2012 at the National Science Foundation where she managed five programs in the Directorates of Education and Human Resources, Computer and Information Science and Engineering and including a NSF cross-cutting program on Science, Engineering, Education for Sustainability (SEES).

The POWER of Writing

UNLV College of Education faculty lead students to success with writing studio series.


In Fall 2015, Drs. Chyllis Scott and Chad Scott of the Department of Teaching and Learning, along with Dr. Margarita Huerta of the Department of Educational and Clinical Studies, taught a series of four free UNLV POWER writing studios for graduate students. POWER stands for “Promoting Outstanding Writing for Excellence in Research.”

In the sessions students learned empirically-based strategies to help them become more productive and efficient academic writers. Topics included strategies for writing regularly, managing your writing time, reading and writing at the same time, and finding support and feedback. Participants also had time to practice writing during the workshops. Participants have noted that the UNLV POWER writing studios have been helpful for writing a thesis, dissertation, grant, resume/curriculum vitae, class project, homework assignment, and writing in general.

UNLV POWER writing studios are open to all COE students. To learn more about the workshops, contact Dr. Chyllis Scott and Dr Margarita Huerta at unlvpower@unlv.edu.

A Model for Mathematics Education

Dr. Stohlmann and colleagues work to demystify notions of mathematical complexity.


Teaching mathematics through the Common Core State Standards is a relatively new area of research. Dr. Micah Stohlmann, Assistant Professor, Ms. Cathrine Maiorca, doctoral candidate, and Dr. Travis Olson, Associate Professor- all from the Department of Teaching and Learning– set out to demystify notions of mathematical complexity and difficulty. In their recent study (Stohlmann, Maiorca, & Olson, 2015a), they examined preservice secondary teachers’ conceptions for teaching mathematics using Modeling-Eliciting Activities (MEAs).

According to Stohlmann and colleagues, research shows that MEAs- activities that seek to construct, evaluate, and review mathematical models- can be difficult for teachers to implement. In addition, teachers are more likely to implement mathematical modeling activities when they have an increased level of self-efficacy with the framework. The current study’s aim was to familiarize participants with mathematical modeling in order to implement within a Common Core State Standards classroom.

Participants were 17 preservice secondary mathematics teachers enrolled in a secondary mathematics methods course. Specifically, participants engaged in a MEA, reflected on their experiences, and discussed how they would implement the mathematical techniques learned into a typical public school classroom. Data were analyzed through cross-case analysis; interpretation focused on group process during the MEA along with general reflections about utility and applicability of the MEA in the classroom.

Findings indicate that it is important to provide mathematical modeling to high school students in the classroom setting. Likewise, it is important to provide training on the implementation of mathematical modeling to secondary mathematics teachers. In order for teachers to implement mathematical modeling techniques effectively, secondary teachers must be taught mathematical modeling while keeping in mind time constraints and Common Core State Standards.

Learn more about Dr. Micah Stohlmann

aStohlmann, M., Maiorca, C., & Olson, T. (2015). Preservice secondary teachers’ conceptions from a mathematical modeling activity and connections to the Common Core State Standards. Mathematics Educator Journal, 24, 21-43.